A New Rhythm in Life

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When we first visited a Garifuna church back in April of 2014, we had never felt so “white” in all our lives! This was not simply because we were the only caucasians there, but also because we could not grasp the rhythm of the music. (Let’s face it – that stereotype came from somewhere, right?) It was clear that there WAS a rhythm to catch because everyone around us was moving in sync. THEY obviously got the rhythm! But it sure looked like their feet moved to one beat, their hips to another, and they clapped to yet another!

The worship team is mostly percussion - a keyboard player, two drummers, a turtle shell player (back left of percussion section) and a maraca player. There are usually two or three female vocalists as well.

The worship team is mostly percussion – a keyboard player, two drummers, a turtle shell player (back left of percussion section) and a maraca player. There are usually two or three female vocalists as well.

Now that we have moved to the north coast, we experience that rhythm 2-3 times a week. We began by watching the feet of someone in front of us and moving along. Some of us have progressed from there and others have not, but last night at church we all felt a difference in our comfort level and in our ability to worship God in a new environment. Feeling more comfortable at church is a big step in moving in!

We are learning a new rhythm in life, as well. There are physical challenges here (like weeks without water in the house and a lot of noise) that we did not have in Pinalejo. There are other challenges (power outages and isolation) that we do not face as often here as we did in Pinalejo. We are adjusting and finding our rhythm. Right now I’m wearing ear plugs to be able to focus on writing!

It is exciting to walk down the street and be known. People greet us by name, and we recognize their faces! It’s very hard to be new in town – and to stand out so much – when everyone else already knows each other. We have so many names to learn, and names are important here and are used more often in conversation than in the culture we came from in Pinalejo. Pray that our minds will be able to handle remembering them all and distinguishing faces!

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One response to this post.

  1. Posted by Andrew and Kim Chang on July 4, 2015 at 5:13 am

    Hi Wesley, this is Andrew and KimLian from Ampang, Malaysia. We are visiting Elaine in Eugene, Oregon. We would like to get in touch with your mom. Please let her know that we are thinking of her and would love to hear from her soon.

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